Upcoming Events at the JHU Museums
  • Sep 1
    TO May 31
    Evergreen Museum & Library Docent Training Program
    September 1, 2017May 31, 2018  |  1:30 PM1:30 PM

    Ongoing with rolling admission

    Location: Evergreen Museum & Library

    Participation in the Docent Program is contingent on securing a favorable background check report. The Museum accepts applications on a rolling basis from community members who wish to become docents. For more information, please email or call 410.516.0341.

    Interested in history, architecture, or decorative arts? Become a tour guide at Evergreen Museum & Library! Volunteer docents at Evergreen lead engaging and interactive tours to a variety of individuals, school groups and community organizations from around the world. Docents also assist with the museum’s special programs and foster an appreciation for art, architecture and history in visitors of all ages.

    Community members who are accepted into the program are required to complete the museum's 4-week Docent Training Course. Volunteers who successfully complete the training will be expected to commit to working a minimum of four hours per month. Docents are needed on weekends and/or weekdays, and schedules can be created to suit your needs and availability.

    Evergreen's volunteers join the intellectual life at Johns Hopkins University, with opportunities for additional training, and are invited to social events, openings, lectures, and tours of other historic sites.

    Download the Application (PDF)

  • Jan 18
    TO Mar 11
    Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern America
    January 18, 2018March 11, 2018
    Location: Homewood Museum Price: Free with museum admission

    This national traveling panel exhibition tells the remarkable story of Alexander Hamilton, the statesman whose face is on the ten-dollar bill, but whose life is a mystery to most Americans. Hamilton (1757–1804), became the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury at age 32, and was a Revolutionary War soldier, financial and legal genius, opponent of slavery, and author of most of the Federalist Papers, which were critical in 1787–1788 in gaining popular support to ratify the Constitution.

    Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern America recounts Hamilton’s meteoric rise from an orphaned, 15-year-old immigrant to George Washington’s aide and a pivotal figure in the founding of the country. Hamilton foresaw the complex modern society the U.S. would become and was a driving force in creating the financial, political and legal systems that have shaped the nation for more than 200 years.

    The Baltimore installation of the exhibition at Homewood Museum brings together a group of important Hamilton-related paintings, sculpture, works on paper, correspondance, ephemera, and other archival documents from the Sheridan Libraries and University Museums, with the addition of several loans from local private collections.

    For more information about the exhibition click here.

  • Feb 1
    Hamilton and the Revolution: Patriotic Songs, New, Old, and Rebellious
    February 1, 2018  |  5:30 PM7:15 PM

    5:30 exhibition viewing / 6:15 talk

    Location: Homewood Museum Price: $8 public; free for members and Johns Hopkins faculty, staff, and students Purchase Tickets

    Seating is limited and advance registration is requested: online through Eventbrite or by calling 410-516-5589. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability.

    As the renowned jazz musician Jon Batiste recently wrote in The Atlantic, "There is music for everything in America—it’s an undeniable part of the fabric of everyday life…. Often [these melodies] serve as the connective tissue between generations.”

    Hear about how today’s generation is learning through music about the life of distinguished and controversial statesman Alexander Hamilton from historian Jim Ashton.

    Dr. Ashton received his doctorate in history from Johns Hopkins University, where his dissertation focused on linking patriotism and nationalist ideologies to the culture and practice of music in 19th-century America.

    This talk is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern America, on view at Homewood Museum through March 11, 2018.

  • Feb 3
    Reflections on Pine: The Movement Continues
    February 3, 2018  |  1:00 PM2:00 PM
    Location: Homewood Museum Price: $8 public; free for members, students, and Johns Hopkins faculty and staff Purchase Tickets

    Fee includes guided museum tour. Due to limited seating, advance registration is requested: online through Eventbrite or by calling 410-516-5589. Walk-in registration is subject to seating availability.

    2017 marked the 50th anniversary of civil unrest in Cambridge, Maryland and the Pine Street Rebellion, following decades of economic and educational segregation in the small Eastern Shore town. In honor of Black History Month, Homewood Museum presents talks by Dion Banks and Kisha Petticolas, co-founders of the Eastern Shore Network for Change (ESNC), who will discuss how the civil rights movement in Cambridge—led by Gloria Richardson—was distinctly different from the national narrative. They will share how the ESNC has garnered community support and its plans to continue the work necessary to create a community in which everyone has the opportunity to be successful.

    Guests are invited to arrive early or stay on after the talk to take a guided tour of Homewood Museum. Tours are offered on the hour and half-hour from 12 noon to 3:30 p.m.

  • Feb 6
    42nd Street, Barnum, and Hamilton: Dance for Theatrical Storytelling
    February 6, 2018  |  5:30 PM7:00 PM

    5:30 Exhibition Viewing / 6pm Talk

    Location: Homewood Museum Price: $12 public; $10 members; Free with Johns Hopkins ID Purchase Tickets

    Due to very limited seating, advance registration is requested: online through Eventbrite or by calling 410-516-5589. Walk-in registration is subject to seating availability.

    Broadway author and director Mark Bramble will discuss the power of dance to tell stories on stage, with examples drawn from his current revivals of the American classic 42nd Street and circus spectacle Barnum, and Hamilton, the hip-hop, pop, and rap musical by Lin-Manuel Miranda.

    The talk is presented in conjunction with Homewood Museum's current exhibition Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern American, on view through March 11, 2018.

    5:30pm Exhibition Viewing

    6:00pm Talk

  • Feb 11
    Chocolate Through the Centuries (first seating)
    February 11, 2018  |  12:00 PM1:30 PM
    Location: Homewood Museum Price: $30 general; $20 members, and JHU faculty, staff, and students. Purchase Tickets

    Limited to 40 participants. Advance, pre-paid registration is required through Eventbrite or by calling 410.516.5589. Member and JHU registration opens December 15, 2017. Not a Member? Join Today! General admission registration opens January 15, 2018.

    Enjoying chocolate is also an expedition into history. Culinary historian Joyce White will explore the rich cultural history of chocolate from its ancient beginnings in Mesoamerica to the present day, with particular emphasis on how it was enjoyed by America’s founding fathers and mothers. Thomas Jefferson was a chocolate fan, as were John and Abigail Adams and George and Martha Washington. Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton suggested a 5-cent tariff on chocolate imports seeing how popular the tasty luxury was among Americans.

    Participants will enjoy hot chocolate during the talk, receive take-home samples of five historical chocolate recipes, and have the opportunity to tour Homewood Museum and see its special exhibition Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern America.

  • Feb 11
    Chocolate Through the Centuries (second seating)
    February 11, 2018  |  2:00 PM3:30 PM
    Joyce White, culinary historian
    Location: Homewood Museum Price: $30 public; $20 members, and JHU faculty, staff, and students. Purchase Tickets

    Limited to 40 participants. Advance, pre-paid registration is required through Eventbrite or by calling 410.516.5589. Member and JHU tickets on sale December 15. Not a Member? Join Today! General admission tickets on sale January 15.

    Enjoying chocolate is also an expedition into history. Culinary historian Joyce White will explore the rich cultural history of chocolate from its ancient beginnings in Mesoamerica to the present day, with particular emphasis on how it was enjoyed by America’s founding fathers and mothers. Thomas Jefferson was a chocolate fan, as were John and Abigail Adams and George and Martha Washington. Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton suggested a 5-cent tariff on chocolate imports seeing how popular the tasty luxury was among Americans.

    Participants will enjoy hot chocolate during the talk, receive take-home samples of five historical chocolate recipes, and have the opportunity to tour Homewood Museum and see its special exhibition Alexander Hamilton: The Man Who Made Modern America.

    The presentation will include take-home boxed samples of five historic chocolate preparations:

    • a 17th-century Aztec-style chocolate drink
    • an 18th-century style tart
    • a 19th-century Bangor brownie
    • a 20th-century style milk chocolate truffle
    • a 21st-century chocolate candy
  • Mar 15
    The Many Faces of Harriet Chew Carroll
    March 15, 2018  |  6:00 PM8:00 PM

    6pm reception; 7pm lecture

    Location: Homewood Museum Price: $15 public; $10 members; free for students and Hopkins faculty and staff. Purchase Tickets

    Seating is limited and advance registration is strongly encourged. Walk-in seating will be based on availablity. To register, visit Eventbrite online or call 410.516.5589.

    When Harriet Chew of Philadelphia married Charles Carroll Jr. in 1800, her future could not have looked brighter. Charles, the only son and intended heir of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, one of the wealthiest men in Maryland, was handsome, urbane, educated, and madly in love with Harriet. But only a decade later, Harriet’s world began to fall apart, and in 1816 she and Charles permanently separated. In this illustrated lecture presented in honor of Women's History Month, historian Mary C. Jeske will explore the many facets of Harriet’s life: her marriage and life as a young bride, her struggle to cope as her husband descended into alcoholism, and her success in adapting to her new situation after she returned to her native Philadelphia. Despite her personal tragedies, financial dependence on the goodwill of her father-in-law, and the legal constraints on women that limited her options, Harriet managed to create a remarkably independent, fulfilling, and happy life for herself, a testament to her inner strength and resilience. Dr. Jeske is an editor at the Charles Carroll of Carrollton Family Papers.

  • Apr 7
    Zora String Quartet
    April 7, 2018  |  3:00 PM5:00 PM

    Music at Evergreen Concert Series

    Music at Evergreen 2017-2018
    Location: Evergreen Museum & Library (Bakst Theatre) Price: $15 members, and JHU faculty, staff, and alumni (with ID); $20 public; $10 students (full-time with ID) Purchase Tickets

    Concert will be performed in the Bakst Theatre. Ticket includes admission to the guided museum tour (departs 12 and 1 p.m.) and a post-concert reception with the musicians. Limited space; advance tickets are recommended. Purchase tickets online or by calling 410.516.0341. For complete details about the Music at Evergreen Concert Series click here.

     

    Dechopol Kowintaweewat, Seula Lee, violins; Pablo Muñoz Salido, viola; Zizai Ning, cello

    Currently the Quartet-in-Residence at the Curtis Institute of Music, the Zorá String Quartet has been praised for its "elegant and probing" performances by the New York Times. They gained national attention in 2015 when they won three major awards, including the Grand Prize and Gold Medal of the Fischoff Chamber Music Competition.

  • Apr 22
    Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen
    April 22, 2018  |  3:00 PM5:00 PM

    music at evergreen concert series

    Music at Evergreen 2017-2018
    Location: Evergreen Museum & Library (Bakst Theatre) Price: $15 members, and JHU faculty, staff, and alumni (with ID); $20 public; $10 students (full-time with ID) Purchase Tickets

    Concert will be performed in the Upper Gardens. Rain location is the Carriage House. Ticket includes admission to the guided museum tour (departs 12 and 1 p.m.) and a post-concert reception with the musicians. Limited space; advance tickets are recommended. Purchase tickets online through Eventbrite or by calling 410.516.0341. For complete details about the Music at Evergreen Concert Series click here.

    Frank Solivan, mandolin, vocals; Mike Munford, banjo, vocals; Chris Luquette, guitar, vocals; Jeremy Middleton, bass, vocals
     

    Frank Solivan is a monster mandolinist and his band Dirty Kitchen is stocked with hot musicians who simmer a bluegrass/newgrass stew from award-winning instrumental, vocal, and songwriting skills. The Grammy-nominated group was named the 2016 Instrumental Group of the Year by the International Bluegrass Music Association. They are "master musicians who fully understand the history and tradition but aren’t afraid to explore new sounds" (Bluegrass Today). Please note: Program will be announced from the stage.

     

     

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