Upcoming Events At Homewood
  • Oct 1
    Recovering Eden: Reconstructing Robert Eden's Annapolis Mansion | Michelle Fitzgerald
    October 1, 2018  |  5:00 PM7:00 PM

    2018 Baltimore's Great Architecture Lectures

    Location: Reception: Homewood Museum; Lecture: Room 111, Mergenthaler Hall Price: $15 public; $10 members of the University Museums and AIABaltimore, and JHU faculty, staff, and alumni (with ID); Free for full-time students (with ID). Purchase Tickets

    Advance, pre-paid registration is strongly requested. Purchase tickets online through Eventbrite or by calling 410.516.5589. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability. For information about lecture series subscriptions, click here.

    Recovering Eden: Reconstructing Robert Eden's Annapolis Mansion 

    When the last proprietary governor of Maryland, Sir Robert Eden, boarded a ship and left Annapolis on June 26, 1776, he left behind a town house that he had been carefully redesigning and furnishing. When he returned at the conclusion of the Revolutionary War, he found that his former house and possessions had been confiscated by the Council of Safety and used for the new state’s Governor’s Mansion. With the objects eventually scattered and the house demolished in the beginning of the twentieth century, the material remnants of Robert Eden’s time in Annapolis should have disappeared. Using archival and remaining physical evidence, Michelle Fitzgerald, The Americana Foundation Curatorial Intern for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, will reconstruct Robert Eden’s Annapolis residence, the Eden-Jennings House, and discuss the social and political motivations that impacted the house’s materiality over the course of its life.

     

    5 p.m. Reception at Homewood Museum

    6 p.m. Lecture in Mergenthaler Hall, Room 111

    Both located on the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus

     

    This is the first lecture in Homewood Museum's 2018 Baltimore's Great Architecture Lectures, Lost and Found, presented as part of Baltimore Architecture Month. 1 AIA/CES LU available per lecture. Series tickets available here

     

    PARKING

    Free parking for this lecture is available in the Johns Hopkins Club parking lot (#41 on the campus parking map), accessible from San Martin Drive. Please note that you will need to take a ticket to activate the parking gate, however, the exit gate will be open so the ticket will not need to be validated.

  • Oct 1
    TO Oct 29
    Lost and Found: 2018 Baltimore's Great Architecture Lecture Series
    October 1, 2018October 29, 2018  |  5:00 PM7:00 PM
    Location: Receptions: Homewood Museum; Lectures: Room 111, Mergenthaler Hal Price: Series subscription: $40 public; $25 JHU Museums and AIA members, and JHU faculty, staff and alumni (with ID); Free for students (full-time with ID). Purchase Tickets

    5 p.m. receptions at Homewood Museum; 6 p.m. lectures in Room 111, Mergenthaler Hall, both located on the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus. Free parking available in the Johns Hopkins Club lot. 

    Advance, pre-paid registration is strongly requested. Purchase tickets online through Eventbrite or by calling 410-516-5589. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability (cash or check only accepted at the door).

    Homewood Museum presents the 18th season of its Baltimore’s Great Architecture Lectures, organized as part of AIABaltimore’s Baltimore Architecture Month. This season, themed "Lost and Found" examines three local architectural treasures that were saved from obscurity by recent scholarship, preservation, and restoration.

     

    • Oct. 1 | Recovering Eden: Reconstructing Robert Eden's Annapolis Mansion | Michelle Fitzgerald
    • Oct. 22 | Becoming Buckland: Rediscovering One of America's Earliest Architects | Rachel Lovett

     

    Free parking for this lecture is available in the Johns Hopkins Club parking lot (#41 on the campus parking map), accessible from San Martin Drive. Please note that you will take a ticket to activate the parking gate, however, the exit gate will be open so the ticket will not need to be validated. 

     

    1 AIA/CES LU available per lecture. 

     

  • Oct 22
    Becoming Buckland: Rediscovering One of America's Earliest Architects | Rachel Lovett
    October 22, 2018  |  5:00 PM7:00 PM

    2018 Baltimore's Great Architecture Lectures

    Location: Reception: Homewood Museum; Lecture: Room 111, Mergenthaler Hall Price: $15 public; $10 members of the University Museums and AIABaltimore, and JHU faculty, staff, and alumni (with ID); Free for full-time students (with ID). Purchase Tickets

    Advance, pre-paid registration is strongly requested. Purchase tickets online through Eventbrite or by calling 410.516.5589. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability. For information about lecture series subscriptions, click here.

    Becoming Buckland: Rediscovering One of America's Earliest Architects

     

    The beautiful Hammond-Harwood House in Annapolis is a masterpiece of skilled craftsmanship and elegant Palladian design. But up until the early twentieth century, the name of its architect had been lost to time. It was only after 1924 that scholars realized that the house could be credited to William Buckland, a man whose name had faded into obscurity. Now, thanks to detailed scholarship, Hammond-Harwood House Curator and Assistant Director Rachel Lovett will discuss Buckland's brief but eventful life, from his birth in Oxford, England, in 1734, to his indenture at George Mason’s Gunston’s Hall, to his time as the architect of choice for the elite of Virginia and Annapolis.

     

    5 p.m. Reception at Homewood Museum
    6 p.m. Lecture in Mergenthaler Hall, Room 111

    Both located on the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus.

     

    This is the second part in Homewood Museum's 2018 Baltimore's Great Architecture Lectures, Lost and Found, presented as part of Baltimore Architecture month. 1 AIA CES learning unit will be available. Series tickets available here

     

    Free event parking will be available in the Johns Hopkins Club parking lot. Advance, pre-paid registration is strongly requested. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability. 

     

    PARKING

    Free parking for this lecture is available in the Johns Hopkins Club parking lot (#41 on the campus parking map), accessible from San Martin Drive. Please note that you will need to take a ticket to activate the parking gate, however, the exit gate will be open so the ticket will not need to be validated.

  • Oct 29
    Revealing the Artist: Restoring the Bay of Naples Mural at Clifton Mansion | Thomas Moore, Gillian Quinn, and Laurie A. Timm
    October 29, 2018  |  5:00 PM7:00 PM

    2018  Baltimore's Great Architecture Lectures

    Location: Reception: Homewood Museum; Lecture: Room 50, Gilman Hall Price: $15 public; $10 members of the University Museums and AIABaltimore, and JHU faculty, staff, and alumni (with ID); Free for full-time students (with ID). Purchase Tickets

    Advance, pre-paid registration is strongly requested. Purchase tickets online through Eventbrite or by calling 410.516.5589. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability. For information about lecture series subscriptions, click here.

    Revealing the Artist: Restoring the Bay of Naples Mural at Clifton Mansion 

    When the Baltimore-based nonprofit Civic Works relocated 25 years ago to Clifton Mansion, the former summer home of Johns Hopkins, the new tenants found evidence of a large wall mural in what was the Italianate mansion's grand entry hall. In April 2017, work began to restore the space, including the 160-year-old mural. Now, almost 18 months later, conservators Thomas Moore, Gillian Quinn, and Laurie A. Timm, will discuss what it took to uncover the 15-by-25-foot painting of the Bay of Naples, and what suprises the mural yeilded as they peeled back layer upon layer of the past. 

     

    5 p.m. Reception at Homewood Museum

    6 p.m. Lecture at Mergenthaler Hall, Room 111

    Both located on the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus.

     

    This is the third and final part in Homewood Museum's 2018 Baltimore's Great Architecture Lectures, Lost and Found, presented as part of Baltimore Architecture Month. 1 AIA CES learning unit will be available. Series tickets available here

     

    PARKING

    Free parking for the lecture series is available in the Johns Hopkins Club parking lot (#41 on the campus parking map), accessible from San Martin Drive. Please note that you will need to take a ticket to activate the parking gate, however, the exit gate will be open so the ticket will not need to be validated.

  • Nov 16
    Homewood Museum Antiques Forum: Baltimore Silver
    November 16, 2018

    includes special tour of private silver collections!

    Location: Homewood Museum, The Johns Hopkins Club, Two Private Residences Price: $100 JHU Museums Members/ $125 non-members Purchase Tickets

    Advance, pre-paid registration is strongly encouraged. Space is limited. Walk-in registration based on seating availability. Purchase tickets online through Eventbrite or by calling 410-516-5589. 

    Join Homewood for a special day-long celebration of fine silver! Using pieces of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century silver from Homewood's collection and private collections, three experts will discuss how aesthetics and fashionable forms emerged and offer insights into the societies in which the pieces were created. After lunch at the Johns Hopkins Club, attendees will have the rare opportunity to tour the exquisite private collections or two local collectors. 

     

    SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

     

    • 9:30-10 A.M. Coffee and registration at Homewood Museum
    • 10:15-11:30 A.M. Talk by Katharine Fitzgerald: "The Harvey Lewis and Carroll Family Salver: A Story to 'Chew' On"
    • 12-1 P.M. Lunch at the Johns Club with keynote presentation by Ann K. Wagner: "Keeping Patrimony Chic: Baltimore's Early Repousse Silver
    • 1-2 P.M. Talk by Paul Winicki: "Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Baltimore Silver
    • 2:30-4 P.M. Tour of antique silver collections at private residences (Attendees must provide their own transportation; directions will be provided on the day of the event)

    ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

    Katharine Fitzgerald 
    Katharine Fitzgerald is a Lois F. McNeil Fellow in the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture at the University of Delaware. A native of New England, she grew up in a family with keen interest in early American material culture. She graduated from Tufts University in 2013 with a Bachelor of Arts in Art History and Italian Studies, and held internships at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, as a researcher in the Contemporary Art Department and in Museum Education. Prior to her Fellowship at Winterthur, she worked for Skinner, Inc., in Appraisal Services and Oriental Rugs and Carpets. Most recently, she completed an internship in the practical work of repairing and maintaining antique clocks with Lili von Baeyer, historic clockmaker and repairwoman, in Philadelphia. During her time at Winterthur, Fitzgerald has pursued her interests in a variety of decorative arts from furniture to silver and has acted as author and co-editor for the Program's Blog, "Material Matters." During her final year at Winterthur, she is looking forward to continuing her thesis work on marine chronometers aboard 19th-century American sail-powered vessels.

     

    Ann K. Wagner - Keynote Speaker
    Ann K. Wagner, Curator of Decorative Arts, is responsible for approximately 20,000 objects of silver, metalware, and related composite materials such as lighting, firearms, and organics at Winterthur Museum in Delaware. She joined the curatorial staff immediately following her master’s degree from the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture at the University of Delaware. Ms. Wagner previously was the curatorial assistant for the department of European and American Decorative Arts at the Seattle Art Museum. She earned a Master of Arts degree in Art History from the University of Washington in Seattle after graduating summa cum laude from Wheaton College, Massachusetts. 

    At Winterthur, Wagner enjoys introducing graduate students and the public to decorative arts and material culture through exhibitions, workshops, and classes. She has spoken to audiences from Los Angeles to Williamsburg and has written articles about American silver for publications including The Magazine Antiques, Fine Art & Antiques, Silver Magazine, and The Decorator. She was an invited contributor to the recent book American Silver in the Art Institute of Chicago, and co-authored a book and co-curated the major traveling exhibition titled: Silversmiths to the Nation: Thomas Fletcher and Sidney Gardiner, 1808-1842. Wagner is an alumna of the Attingham Summer School, Society of Winterthur Fellows, and member of the Association of Art Museum Curators, the London Silver Society, the New York Silver Society, the American Ceramics Circle, and The Royal Oak Foundation.

     

    Paul Winicki
    Paul Winicki is the founder of Radcliffe Jewelers, an appraiser with more than 34 years experience, and a veteran on PBS's Antiques Roadshow. He has particular expertise in antique pocket watches and wristwatches, antique American silver—Baltimore silver, in particular—as well as furniture from the early 19th century through the early 20th century. He has served on the board of the Baltimore Museum of Art's American Wing and currently sits on the Acquisition Committee for the Maryland Historical Society. He has spoken at numerous antique shows and other events and on the topic of American antique silver. 

     

     

  • Dec 3
    Homewood by Candlelight
    December 3, 2018  |  5:30 PM7:30 PM
    Location: Homewood Museum Price: Free for members and JHU faculty, staff, and students; $8 non-members Purchase Tickets

    Reservations requested through Eventbrite or by calling 410.516.5589. 

    Decorated for the holidays with garlands and boxwood, Homewood exudes a festive spirit that is best witnessed at the museum's annual Homewood by Candlelight open house. Glittering candlelight throughout the museum make Homewood appear as it might have in the early 19th century. The furnished period rooms will be filled with festive decor, the museum shop will offer a wide variety of holiday gift-giving ideas for people of all ages, and seasonal refreshments will be served in the wine cellar. 

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