Upcoming Events At Homewood
  • Feb 1
    TO Feb 29
    FREE ADMISSION FEBRUARY AT HOMEWOOD
    February 1, 2020February 29, 2020

    FREE GUIDED TOURS | Tuesday-Sunday during February

    Price: FREE for individuals and groups under 7

    Tours of Homewood depart on the hour (last tour at 3 p.m.). Advance reservations appreciated by calling 410.516.5589. Groups over 6 require advance reservation.

    In honor of Black History Month, Homewood Museum is offering FREE admission for the entire month of February. Admission includes a guided tour of the museum that draws on new scholarship to tell the stories of Charles and Harriet Carroll, for whom Homewood was constructed in 1801, and two enslaved families, the Rosses and the Conners, who labored for the Carrolls in first quarter of the 19th century. 

    Using Homewood's exquisitely restored period rooms and its world renowned collections, the tour reveals how the fates of all three families became inextricably linked, in ways both typical and unexpected. The tour also contextualizes their experiences within early republic Baltimore, when slavery and ideals of liberty shaped and steered the young nation. 

    Since its official launch in February 2019, the tour has been honored by both Baltimore magazine and Baltimore Heritage for its inclusive, uncompromising examination of life inside Homewood during those years. Whether you are new to Homewood or have experienced it before, this new tour provides fresh insights about Homewood's first residents and the complex society in which they sought fulfillment.  

  • Feb 5
    Failed Moses: An Escaped Slave Recaptured
    February 5, 2020  |  12:00 PM1:00 PM
    Location: Homewood Museum Price: Free; registration required Purchase Tickets

    Seating is limited and advance registration is requested: online through Eventbrite or by calling 410-516-5589. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability.

    Join Homewood for a special brown bag lunchtime talk on Moses Addision, the enslaved who led an attempted escape from Doughoregan Manor after Charles Carroll of Carrollton's death in 1832. Hear from researcher Johnathan Carroll III how Moses and two other fugitives made their way to Homewood and how their eventual recapture reverberated through local enslaved communities. 


    Jonathan Carroll III is a special education teacher, coach, and amateur genealogist. His is currently on leave from Princeton University, where he is a Religion major with a focuse on African American history and Liberation Theology. 

  • Feb 10
    Interpreting Slavery at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello
    February 10, 2020  |  10:00 AM12:00 PM
    Location: Homewood Museum Price: Free; space is limited, please register Purchase Tickets

    Seating is limited and advance registration is requested: online through Eventbrite or by calling 410-516-5589. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability.

    Homewood Museum welcomes Linnea Grimm, Director of Education and Visitor Programs at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, for a program that will explore Monticello expanded tours to include historical represenations of slavery and interpretations of the difficult history of Sally Hemmings' life with Thomas Jefferson. (PLEASE NOTE: Snow date is Monday, February 17, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.)


    Linnea Grimm has been the Hunter J. Smith Director of Education and Visitor Programs at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello since 2009. She possesses a M.A. in History Museum Studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program (State University of New York, College at Oneonta) and a B.A. from the College of William and Mary. 

     

    This project was made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services

     

  • Mar 11
    TO Jun 5
    Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in the Nineteenth-Century Home
    March 11, 2020June 5, 2020

    SPECIAL HOUSE-WIDE EXHIBITION!

    Location: Homewood Museum Price: Free with museum admission

    NEW EXHIBITION!

    Each day, American consumers make hundreds of choices that directly and indirectly contribute to the protection or destruction of the natural environment. But this predicament is not unique to our age. Americans of the early nineteenth century, like the Carrolls of Homewood, also struggled to reconcile the twin impulses of capitalism and conservation. 

    In Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in the Nineteenth-Century Home, Homewood Museum mines its impressive collection of early nineteenth-century decorative arts to explore this dichotomy. From mahogany furniture that encouraged mass deforestation to lithographs that celebrated the new nation's natural splendor, the house-wide exhibition reveals early Americans' complex relationship to their environment and the role Baltimore played as a bustling port of trade and taste-making city. 

    With April 2020 marking the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, Naturally Beautiful asks visitors to consider the museum in a new light and ponder the parallels between historical consumption habits and the current environmental crisis. 

     

    VISITOR INFORMATION

    Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in the Nineteenth-Century Home is free with regular museum admission. Homewood Museum is open Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday, noon-4 p.m. To arrange group tours of seven or more, please call the museum at 410-516-5589.  


    THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

    This exhibition is made possible in part by Forbes and Sara Maner, Eileen Perkins, and Jill E. McGovern. 

  • Mar 25
    Divorce for Women: Debating the Marriage Contract in Early America
    March 25, 2020  |  5:30 PM7:30 PM
    Location: Homewood Museum Price: Free for JHU Museums Members and JHU Faculty, Staff & Students (w/ valid ID); $10 General Public Purchase Tickets

    Seating is limited and advance registration is requested: online through Eventbrite or by calling 410-516-5589. Walk-in registration is based on seating availability.

    Homewood's annual Women's History Month lecture welcomes Lauren Feldman, a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the Johns Hopkins University, to discuss the complicated contours of marriage in early America, revealing an institution that was at the epicenter of heated social and legal debate.

     

    Reception: 5:30-6:30 p.m.

    Talk: 6:30-7:30 p.m. 

     


     

    Lauren Feldman is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the Johns Hopkins University, focusing on gender, family, and intimacy in the nineteenth century U.S. She is the recipeint of grants and fellowships from the New-York Historical Society, the Maryland Historical Society, and the Iowa Women's Archives, among others. Prior to pursuing her Ph.D., she received an A.B. in History from Harvard College. 

     

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