The Lifted Veil

The Lifted Veil

April 29 – September 25, 2022

Evergreen Museum & Library, North Wing Gallery
Free

For many years, fine art photographer Phyllis Arbesman Berger saw the world through a cloudy veil because of cataracts. During that time, she concentrated on making images in black and white. And then a miracle: cataract surgery and the world came alive in blazing color, full of intensity, as well as dreamy subtlety.

This group of photographs, ranging from infrared to color, shows how her view of the world has changed by revisiting photographs of her favorite places in Ireland; Brittany, France; and the Eastern Shore of Maryland, and reimagining them in glorious technicolor through the magic of Photoshop.

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Pictured: View from the Edge: Cliffs of Moher County Clare, Ireland


Front entrance of Evergreen Museum

Evergreen as Muse

April 29 – June 26, 2022

Evergreen Museum & Library
Guided Tour

This exhibition showcases photographs by 10 Johns Hopkins University undergraduate students who were inspired by the history of Evergreen, its inhabitants, and its world-famous library, art collection, and grounds. Their photographs will be located throughout the museum in areas that prompted their work. The exhibition will remain on view through Sunday, June 26, 2022 and can be seen via a guided tour of the museum.

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Oval-back chair with dimity slipcover

Baltimore Oval-Back Chairs Restored

On view through December 30, 2022

Homewood Museum
Guided Tour

In 2019, Homewood launched a Dress-A-Chair fundraising campaign to outfit six Baltimore-made, oval-back chairs with custom reproduction slipcovers. Work on the chairs is now complete and can be admired in a small exhibit in the Reception Hall that includes information on the chairs, as well as an exhibit case exploring joinery and upholstery. Included with regular admission.

The oval-back frame is a particular favorite style that came out of Baltimore in the early nineteenth century. Each chair also features an example of the famous Baltimore bellflower, a carved motif favored by Baltimore furniture-makers.

The design of the slipcover was chosen based on early nineteenth-century period imagery and modeled off of reproductions produced recently by Colonial Williamsburg for similar chairs. We consulted with several Mid-Atlantic curators before determining that white dimity with a ruffled skirt would be an appropriate fit for a property used as a summer estate. The fabric was woven on a loom by Rabbit Goody up in New York and the slipcovers were made by Alan Ibello from Baltimore.

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